Last updated: January 27. 2014 8:00AM - 188 Views

Amy Tyree speaks to Kiwanis about the Adult Literacy program that she teaches. (Inquirer Photo/Nathan Crock)
Amy Tyree speaks to Kiwanis about the Adult Literacy program that she teaches. (Inquirer Photo/Nathan Crock)
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By Nathan Crock


Inquirer Correspondent


On Tuesday, Jan. 21 Kiwanis of Galion held its weekly meeting. Amy Tyree from the ABLE program was on hand to be the guest speaker.


ABLE stands for Adult Basic and Literacy Education. Tyree spoke about the program as well as the classes that she teaches in Galion, held at the Ohio Heartland Community Action Center. Classes are also offered in Bucyrus at the Lincoln Administrative Offices.


These classes help those who want to obtain their GED or improve their basic skills to further their education or career. Tyree said that this program is free to the public; the only cost is for taking the GED test. There are currently between 18-20 students who attend the classes in Galion, which take place Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Tyree said that since September she has had six graduates. Between 2012-2013 the Mansfield ABLE program served over 800 students, with 217 of those students receiving their GED.


Tyree is a former professor at NC State College where she taught science and biology. She enjoys it and loves changing lives. She said that they have a new orientation every month and those who want to sign up can call Crawford County Jobs Plus at 419-562-8066.


When the students are ready to take the GED test they can take it in sections or as a whole. Right now Tyree is concerned about funding, as the students must pay for the test on their own and it can cost anywhere from $60 to $120.


She would like to see some scholarships be set up to help these students. If that were to happen then it would help to pay for the test as well as much needed laptops. As of this month the test is now completely online. She said that no matter how much preparation one puts into memorizing the material that for those who don’t know basic computer skills it can be a challenge.


She asks if anyone has an old laptop sitting around somewhere to please give. She said they would even take in an old keyboard that doesn’t work just so the students can learn where the keys are on it. Within the next year she would like to get the computer level skills up on the students.


The program is funded by an instructional grant and partners that supports the program are Richland and Crawford Counties Job and Family Services, North Central State College, Pioneer Career and Technology Center, Richland County Jail, The Ohio Heartland Community Action Center in Galion, Bucyrus City Schools, and other agencies within Richland and Crawford Counties.

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